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Amos Joel Makweta
Msc.(soil Science), Senior Research Officer, Soil Fertility Management, Tea Research Institute Of Tanzania, P.o.box 2177,
Effect Of Harvesting Methods And Npk Fertilizer On Tea Shoot Weight And Its Implication In A Long Term To Tea Production In Tanzania
Tea (Camellia sinensis (L), in Tanzania has been traditionally harvested by hand. In recent years, the shortages of labour and high cost associated with hand harvesting have compelled tea growers to opt for mechanical harvesting. Mechanical harvesting has high productivity, but it has some undesirable effects including decline in yield. Shoot weight is one of the yield components. The objective

Amos Joel Makweta (MSc. Soil Science)
Senior Research Officer, Tea Research Institute Of Tanzania, P.o.box 2177, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
Effect Of Different Fertilizer Rates And Harvesting Methods On Banhji Shoot
Although soft banhji shoots produce good quality tea, they are not desirable because they become coarse rapidly. Further more, banhji shoot prevents development of the shoot thereby contributing to yield reduction. Where possible, it is desirable to reduce banhji shoots. Mechanical harvesting is becoming the option in many countries including Tanzania but, its effect on banhji not yet clear atleast

Amos Joel Makweta (MSc. Soil Science)
Senior Research Officer, Tea Research Institute Of Tanzania, P.o.box 2177, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
Comparison Of Soil Ph Between Tea Fields Under Hand And Mechanical Tea Harvesting
In Tanzania, mechanizing tea harvesting is becoming a necessity. Through the available knowledge, it is known that mechanical tea harvesting is non selective as such it takes more biomass from the plant than hand method. Moreover, the extent of damage to the plant is also higher. Because of these differences, nutrients uptake by plants might have effect on soil chemical

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